Typhoon Rammasun (Glenda) is expected to move west-northwestward during the next 24 hours, and will continue its track through 36 hours.  By 48 to 72 hours, it shall turn more to the northwest.  On the forecast track, the typhoon will enter the warm waters of the Albay Gulf Tuesday afternoon, making landfall over Northeastern Albay by Tuesday evening (approximately 7-PM), crossing  the Southern part of Camarines Sur between 9PM-12AM.  Rammasun (Glenda) will be traversing Southern Quezon and Metro Manila, Wednesday morning and shall be over the West Philippine Sea by early July 16, Wednesday evening.  By Thursday afternoon, the typhoon shall exit the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) while moving across the South China Sea towards Southern Chin

Residents of the slum community of Baseco evacuate to safer grounds as Typhoon Rammasun battered Manila, Philippines, Wednesday, July 16, 2014. Rammasun knocked out power in many areas but it spared the Philippine capital and densely populated northern provinces from being directly battered Wednesday when its fierce wind shifted slightly away, officials said. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
Residents of the slum community of Baseco evacuate to safer grounds as Typhoon Rammasun battered Manila, Philippines, Wednesday, July 16, 2014. Rammasun knocked out power in many areas but it spared the Philippine capital and densely populated northern provinces from being directly battered Wednesday when its fierce wind shifted slightly away, officials said. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

Typhoon Rammasun (Glenda) damaged many structures in Southern Luzon, located South of Manila in the Philippines. Many were left homeless.
Typhoon Rammasun (Glenda) damaged many structures in
Southern Luzon, located South of Manila in the Philippines.
Many were left homeless.

Some roads had some flooding as Typhoon Glenda hit Metro Manila early on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.

Filipino residents re-build destroyed homes in the typhoon hit city of Muntinlupa, South of Manila, Philippines, 17 July 2014. The strongest to hit the country this year, typhoon Rammasun (Glenda), killed 38 people and left nearly 2 million in the capital and eastern provinces without power for a second day, which lasted for more than a week, disaster management officials said. Most of the deaths were caused by toppled trees, collapsed structures and other debris whipped up by Rammasun’s ferocious winds up to 150 kilometers per hour (kph) and gusts of up to 185 kph, the National Disaster Risk Management Agency said. The Philippines is still recovering from super typhoon Haiyan, which killed more than 6,200 people, and displaced over 4 million in November 2013. (Photoville International)

July 22, 2014, Thursday, 12:44 PM, Manila, Philppines, 5 days after the typhoon.  80% of the country are still suffering from blackout.  I am here at home, writing this blog, 30 minutes after the power supply in our village was restored.
July 22, 2014, Thursday, 12:44 PM, Manila, Philppines, 5 days after the typhoon. 80% of the country are still suffering from blackout. I am here at home, writing this blog, 30 minutes after the power supply in our village was restored.

Today’s not a very good day. The stormy weather kept Mr. Sun from shining. Cold, heavy drops, fell from the sky, pounding the surface, breaking the calm. Yet today, I smiled a little. I thought, if only sunshine and happiness grew in fields, I would pick bunches, and tightfisted, carry them home. I would bind them in clutches, with ribbon and twine – warm, bright, buttery yellow bouquets – and deliver them proudly to the doors of my soul. Today, in the middle of the serial killer storm Glenda, I smiled a little, because I know, the good stuff is still ahead. That is why today, I took a snap of that faith – my faith, because it’s shining through.

Surviving a typhoon, especially one as strong and relentless as Rammasun (Glenda), offers plenty of lessons that allow us to put things in perspective.

How do you count your blessings?

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